The “Other” Value Levers of Automation – Part 2 – Democratizing Expertise

The basic meaning of democratization (in a non-political sense) is to make something accessible to everyone. This is the core of so much software that is written today that it is highly ironic how it is rarely systematically applied to the process of actually producing software. However, it is this aspect of automation that is a key _reason_ why automation delivers such throughput benefits. By encapsulating complexity and expertise into something easily consumed, novices can perform tasks in which they are not expert and do so on demand. In other words, it makes the ‘scarce expertise’ bottleneck can be made irrelevant.

Scaled software environments are now far too complex and involve too many integrated technologies for there to be anyone who really understands all of the pieces at a detailed level. Large scale complexity naturally drives the process of specialization. This has been going on for ages in society at large and there are plenty of studies that describe how we could not really have cities if we did not parcel out all of the basic tasks of planning, running, and supplying the city to many specialists. No one can be an expert in power plants, water plants, sewage treatment plants, and all of the pumps, circuits, pipes, and pieces in them. So, we have specialists.

Specialists, however, create a natural bottleneck. Even in a large situation where you have many experts in something, the fact that the people on the scene are unable to take action means they are waiting and, people who depend on that group are waiting. A simple example is unstopping a clogged pipe. Not the world’s most complex issue, but it is a decent lens for illustrating the bottleneck factor. On one hand, if you don’t know anything about plumbing, then you have to call (and wait for) a plumber. Think of the time saved if a plumber was always right next to the drain and could jump right in and unclog that pipe.

Example problems, such as plumbing, that require physical fixes are much harder, of course. In the case of a scaled technology environment, we are fortunate to be able to work with much more malleable stuff – software and software-defined infrastructure. Before we get too excited by that, however, we should remember that, while our environments are far easier to automate than, say, a PVC pipe, we still face the knowledge and tools barrier. And the fact that technology organizations have a lot people waiting and depending on technology ‘plumbers’ is one of the core drivers of why the DevOps movement is so resonant in the first place.

Consider the situation where developers need an environment in which to build new features for an application system. If developers in that environment can click a button and have a fully operational, representative infrastructure for their application system provisioned and configured in minutes, it is because the knowledge of how to do that has been captured. That means that ever time a developer needs to refresh their environment, a big chunk of time is saved by not having to wait on the ‘plumber’ (expert). And that is before taking into account the fact that the removal of that dependency on the expert allows the developer to more frequently refresh their environment – which creates opportunities to enhance quality and productivity. And a similar value proposition exists for testers, demo environments, etc. Even if the automated process is no faster than the expert-driven approach it replaces, the removal of the wait time delivers a massive value proposition.

So, automating value lever number one is ‘power to the people’. Consider that when choosing what to automate first and how much to invest in automating that thing. It doesn’t matter how “cool” or “powerful” a concept is if it doesn’t help the masses in your organization. This should be self-evident, but you still hear people waxing on about how much faster things start in Docker. A few questions later and you figure out that they only actually start those based on one of their ops guys getting an open item through an IT ticketing system from 2003…

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