Old Habits Make DevOps Transformation Hard

My father is a computer guy. Mainframes and all of the technologies that were cool a few decades ago. I have early memories of playing with fascinating electro-mechanical stuff at Dad’s office and its datacenter. Printers, plotters, and their last remaining card punch machine in a back corner. Crazy cool stuff for a kid if you have ever seen that gear in action. There’s all kinds of noise and things zipping around.

Now the interesting thing about talking to Dad is that he is seriously geeky about tech. Always fascinated by the future of how tech would be applied and he completely groks the principals and potentials of new technology even if he does not really get the specific implementations. Recently he had a problem printing from his iPhone. He had set it up a long time ago and it worked great. He’s 78 and didn’t bat an eye at connecting his newfangled mobile device to his printer. What was interesting was his behavior when the connection stopped working. He tried mightily to fix the connection definition rather than deleting the configuration and simply recreating it with the wizard. That got me thinking about “fix it” behavior and troubleshooting behavior in IT.

My dad, as an old IT guy, had long experience and training that you fix things when they got out of whack. You certainly didn’t expect to delete a printer definition back in the day – you would edit the file, you would test it, and you would fiddle with it until you got the thing working again. After all, you had just the relatively few pieces of equipment in the datacenter and offices. That makes no sense in a situation where you can simply blow the problematic thing away and let the software automatically recreate it.

And that made me think about DevOps transformations in the enterprise.

I run into so many IT shops where people far younger than my dad struggle mightily to troubleshoot and fix things that could (or should) be easily recreated. To be fair – some troubleshooting is valuable and educational, but a lot is over routine stuff that is either well known, industry standard, or just plain basic. Why isn’t that stuff in an automated configuration management system? Or a VM snapshot? Or a container? Heck – why isn’t it in the Wiki, at least?! And the funny thing is that these shops are using virtualization and cloud technologies already, but treat the virtual artifacts the same way as they did the long-lasting, physical equipment-centric setups of generations past. And that is why so many DevOps conversations come back to culture. Or perhaps ‘habit’ is a better term in this case.

Breaking habits is hard, but we must if we are to move forward. When the old ways do not work for a retired IT guy, you really have to think about why anyone still believes they work in a current technology environment.

This article is on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/old-habits-make-devops-transformation-hard-dan-zentgraf

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