The “Other” Value Levers of Automation – Part 1 – Introduction

Much of the automation discussion in DevOps focuses on speed or, if a more enlightened conversation, throughput. That is unfortunate, because it values a narrow dimension of automation without considering what makes things actually faster. That narrowness means that underlying inefficiencies can be masked by raw power. Too often that results in a short-term win followed by stagnation and an inability to improve farther. Sometimes it even creates a win that crumbles after a short period and results in a net loss. All of which translate to a poor set of investment priorities. These next few posts will look at why automation works – the core, simple levers that make it valuable – in an attempt to help people frame their discussion, set their priorities, and make smart investments in automation as they move their DevOps initiatives forward.

To be fair, let’s acknowledge that there is a certain sexiness about speed that can distract from other important conversations. Speed is very marketable as we have seen that for ages in the sports car market. Big horsepower numbers and big top speeds always get big glowing headlines, but more often than not, the car that is the best combined package will do best around a track even if it does not have the highest top speed. As engines and power have become less of a distinguishing factor (there are a surprising number of 200+mph cars on the market now), people are figuring that out. Many top-flight performance cars have begun to talk about their ‘time around the Nurburgring’ (a legendary racetrack in Germany) as a more holistic performance measure rather than just focusing on ‘top speed’.

The concept of the complete package being more important is well understood in engineering-driven automobile racing and winning teams have always used non-speed factors to gain competitive advantage. For example, about 50 years ago, Colin Chapman the founder of Lotus cars and designer of World Championship winning racing cars, famously said that “Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere”. In other words, raw speed and top speed are important, but, if you have to slow down to turn you are likely to be beaten. Currently, Audi dominates endurance racing by running diesel powered cars that have to make fewer pitstops than the competition. They compete on the principle that even the fastest racecar is very beatable when it is sitting still being fueled.

So, since balance is an important input in achieving the outcomes of speed and throughput, I think we should look at some of the balancing value levers of automation in a DevOps context. In short, a discussion of the more subtle reasons _why_ automation takes center stage when we seek to eliminate organizational silos and how to balance the various factors.

The three non-speed value levers of automation that we will look at across the next few posts are:
1 – Ability to ‘democratize’ expertise
2 – Ability to automate delegation
3 – Traceability

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