Your Deployment Doc Might Not be Useful for DevOps

One of the most common mistakes I see people making with automation is the assumption that they can simply wrap scripts around what they are doing today and be ‘automated’. The assumption is based around some phenomenally detailed runbook or ‘deployment document’ that has every command that must be executed. In ‘perfect’ sequence. And usually in a nice bold font. It was what they used for their last quarterly release – you know, the one two months ago? It is also serving as the template for their next quarterly release…

It’s not that these documents are bad or not useful. They are actually great guideposts and starting points for deriving a good automated solution to releasing software in their environment. However, you have to remember that these are the same documents that are used to guide late night, all hands, ‘war room’ deployments. The idea that their documented procedures are repeatablly automate-able is suspect, at best, based on that observation alone.

Deployment documents break down as an automate-able template for a number of reasons. First, there are almost always some number of undocumented assumptions about the state of the environment before a release starts. Second, using the last one does not account for procedural, parameter, or other changes between the prior and the upcomming releases. Third, the processes usually unconsciously rely on interpretation or tribal knowledge on the part of the person executing the steps. Finally, there is the problem that steps that make sense in a sequential, manual process will not take advantage of the intrinsic benefits of automation, such as parallel execution, elimination of data entry tasks, and so on.

The solution is to never set the expectation – particularly to those with organizational power – that the document is only a starting point. Build the automation iteratively and schedule multiple iterations at the start of the effort. This can be a great way to introduce Agile practices into the traditionally waterfall approaches used in operations-centric environments. This approach allows for the effort that will be required to fill in gaps in the document’s approach, negotiate standard packaging and tracking of deploy-able artifacts, add environment ‘config drift’ checks, or any of the other common ‘pitfall’ items that require more structure in an automated context.

This article is also on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-deployment-doc-might-useful-devops-dan-zentgraf

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