DevOps is about Developing a Change Application System

As the DevOps movement rolls on, there is a pattern emerging. Some efforts are initiated by development, seeking relief on test environment management. Others are initiated by operations departments trying to get more automation and instrumentation into the environments they manage. I frequently hear comments that are variations on “same stuff I’ve been doing for xx years, different title” from people who have DevOps in their job title or job description. Their shops are hoping that if they encourage folks to think about DevOps and maybe try some new tools, they will get the improvements promised by DevOps discussions online. Well, just like buying a Ferrari and talking it up won’t make you Michael Schumacher, having Puppet or Chef to do your configuration management won’t “make you DevOps” (whatever that means). Successful DevOps shops are bypassing the window dressing and going at DevOps as a project unto itself.

There are a number of unique aspects to undertaking a project such as this. They require a holistic perspective on the process, touch a very broad range of activities, and provide an approach for changing other systems while being constantly changed themselves.

These projects are unique in the software organization because they require a team to look at the whole end-to-end approach to delivering changes to the application systems within that organization FROM THE SIDE; rather than from a position somewhere in the middle of the process. This is an important difference in approach, because it forces a change in perspective on the problem. Typically, someone looking from either the development or the operations “end” of the process will often suffer from a perceptive problem where the “closer” problems in the process look bigger than the ones “farther” up or down the process line. It is a very human thing to be deceived by the perspective of our current position. After all, there are countless examples of using perspective for optical illusions. Clever Leaning Tower of Pisa pictures (where someone appears to be holding it up) and the entire Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (the actors playing the hobbits are not that short) provide easy examples. Narrowness of perspective is, in fact, a frequent reason that “grassroots” efforts’ fail outside of small teams. Successfully making large and impactful changes requires a broader perspective.

The other breadth-related aspect of these programs is that they touch a very wide range of activities over time and seek to optimize for flow both through and among each. That means that they have some similarities with supply chain optimization and ERP projects if not in scale, then in complexity. And the skills to look at those flows probably do not exist directly within the software organization, but in the business units themselves. It can be difficult for technology teams, that see themselves as critical suppliers of technology to business units, to accept that there are large lessons to be learned about technology development from the business units. It takes a desire to learn and change at a level well above a typical project.

A final unique part is that there must be ongoing programs for building and enhancing a system for managing consistent and ongoing changes in other systems. Depending on your technology preference, there are plenty of analogies from pipelines, powergrids and aircraft that apply here. Famous and fun ones are the flight control systems of intrinsically unstable aircraft such as the F-16 fighter or B-2 bomber. These planes use technology to adjust control surfaces within fractions of a second to maintain steady and controled flight within the extreme conditions faced by combat aircraft. Compared to that, delivering enhancements to a release automation system every few weeks sounds trivial, but maintaining the discipline and control to do so in a large organization can be a daunting task.

So the message here is to deliberately establish a program to manage how changes are applied. Accept that it is going to be a new and unusual thing in your organization and that it is going to require steady support and effort to be successful. Without that acceptance, it will likely not work out.

My next few posts are going to dig into this deeper and begin looking at the common aspects of these programs, how people approach the problem, how they organize and prioritize their efforts, and the types of tools they are using.

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One thought on “DevOps is about Developing a Change Application System

  1. Pingback: A System for Changing Systems – Part 1 – Approach « Crossing Silos

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