A System for Changing Systems – Part 4 – Groundwork for Understanding the Capabilities of a System Changing System

In the last couple of posts, we have talked about how application systems need a change application system around them to manage the changes to the application system itself. A “system to manage the system” as it were. We also talked about the multi-part nature of application systems and the fact that the application systems typically run in more than one environment at any given time and will “move” from environment to environment as part of their QA process. These first three posts seek to set a working definition of the thing being changed so that we can proceed to a working definition of a system for managing those changes. This post starts that second part of the series – defining the capabilities of a change application system. This definition will then serve as the base for the third part – pragmatically adopting and applying the capabilities to begin achieving a DevOps mode of operation.

DevOps is a large problem domain with many moving parts. Just within the first set of these posts, we have seen how four rather broad area definitions can multiply substantially in a typical environment. Further, there are aspects of the problem domain that will be prioritized by different stakeholders based on their discipline’s perspective on the problem. The whole point of DevOps, of course, is to eliminate that perspective bias. So, it becomes very important to have some method for unifying the understanding and discussion of the organizations’ capabilities. In the final analysis, it is not as important what that unified picture looks like as it is that the picture be clearly understood by all.

To that end, I have put together a framework that I use with my customers to help in the process of understanding their current state and prioritizing their improvement efforts. I initially presented this framework at the Innovate 2012 conference and subsequently published an introductory whitepaper on the IBM developerWorks website. My intent with these posts is to expand the discussion and, hopefully, help folks get better faster. The interesting thing to me is to see folks adopt this either as is or as the seed of something of their own. Either way, it has been gratifying to see folks respond to it in its nascent form and I think the only way for it to get better is to get more eyeballs on it.

So, here is my picture of the top-level of the capability areas (tools and processes) an organization needs to have to deliver changes to an application system.

Capabilities

Overview of capability areas required to sustain environments

The quality and maturity of these within the organization will vary based on their business needs – particularly around formality – and the frequency with which they need to apply changes.

I applied three principles when I put this together:

  • The capabilities had to be things that exist in all environments that application system runs (ie dev, test, prod, or whatever layers exist). THe idea here is that such a perspective will help unify tooling and approaches to a theoretical ideal of one solution for all environments.
  • The capabilities had to be broad enough to allow for different levels of priority / formality depending on the environment. The idea is to not burden a more volatile test environment with production-grade formality or vice-versa. But to allow a structured discussion of how the team will deliver that capability in a unified way to the various environments. DevOps is an Agile concept, so the notion of minimally necessary applies.
  • The capabilities had to be generic enough to apply to any technology stack that an organization might have. Larger organizations may need multiple solutions based on the fact that they have many application systems that were created at different points in time, in different languages, and in different architectures. It may not be possible to use exactly the same tool / process in all of those environments, but it most certainly is possible to maintain a common understanding and vocabulary about it.

In the next couple of posts, I will drill a bit deeper into the capability areas to apply some scope, focus, and meaning.

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DevOps is about Developing a Change Application System

As the DevOps movement rolls on, there is a pattern emerging. Some efforts are initiated by development, seeking relief on test environment management. Others are initiated by operations departments trying to get more automation and instrumentation into the environments they manage. I frequently hear comments that are variations on “same stuff I’ve been doing for xx years, different title” from people who have DevOps in their job title or job description. Their shops are hoping that if they encourage folks to think about DevOps and maybe try some new tools, they will get the improvements promised by DevOps discussions online. Well, just like buying a Ferrari and talking it up won’t make you Michael Schumacher, having Puppet or Chef to do your configuration management won’t “make you DevOps” (whatever that means). Successful DevOps shops are bypassing the window dressing and going at DevOps as a project unto itself.

There are a number of unique aspects to undertaking a project such as this. They require a holistic perspective on the process, touch a very broad range of activities, and provide an approach for changing other systems while being constantly changed themselves.

These projects are unique in the software organization because they require a team to look at the whole end-to-end approach to delivering changes to the application systems within that organization FROM THE SIDE; rather than from a position somewhere in the middle of the process. This is an important difference in approach, because it forces a change in perspective on the problem. Typically, someone looking from either the development or the operations “end” of the process will often suffer from a perceptive problem where the “closer” problems in the process look bigger than the ones “farther” up or down the process line. It is a very human thing to be deceived by the perspective of our current position. After all, there are countless examples of using perspective for optical illusions. Clever Leaning Tower of Pisa pictures (where someone appears to be holding it up) and the entire Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (the actors playing the hobbits are not that short) provide easy examples. Narrowness of perspective is, in fact, a frequent reason that “grassroots” efforts’ fail outside of small teams. Successfully making large and impactful changes requires a broader perspective.

The other breadth-related aspect of these programs is that they touch a very wide range of activities over time and seek to optimize for flow both through and among each. That means that they have some similarities with supply chain optimization and ERP projects if not in scale, then in complexity. And the skills to look at those flows probably do not exist directly within the software organization, but in the business units themselves. It can be difficult for technology teams, that see themselves as critical suppliers of technology to business units, to accept that there are large lessons to be learned about technology development from the business units. It takes a desire to learn and change at a level well above a typical project.

A final unique part is that there must be ongoing programs for building and enhancing a system for managing consistent and ongoing changes in other systems. Depending on your technology preference, there are plenty of analogies from pipelines, powergrids and aircraft that apply here. Famous and fun ones are the flight control systems of intrinsically unstable aircraft such as the F-16 fighter or B-2 bomber. These planes use technology to adjust control surfaces within fractions of a second to maintain steady and controled flight within the extreme conditions faced by combat aircraft. Compared to that, delivering enhancements to a release automation system every few weeks sounds trivial, but maintaining the discipline and control to do so in a large organization can be a daunting task.

So the message here is to deliberately establish a program to manage how changes are applied. Accept that it is going to be a new and unusual thing in your organization and that it is going to require steady support and effort to be successful. Without that acceptance, it will likely not work out.

My next few posts are going to dig into this deeper and begin looking at the common aspects of these programs, how people approach the problem, how they organize and prioritize their efforts, and the types of tools they are using.

New Toy!!! IBM Workload Deployer

The company I work for serves many large corporations in our customer base, many of whom are IBM shops with the commensurately large WebSphere installed bases.  So, as you might imagine, it behooves us to keep abreast of the latest stuff IBM delivers.

We are fortunate enough to be pretty good at what we do and are in the premiere tier of IBM’s partner hierarchy and were recently able to get an IBM Workload Deployer (IWD) appliance in as an evaluation unit.  If you are not familiar, the IWD is really the third revision of the appliance formerly known as the IBM WebSphere Cloudburst appliance.  I do not know, but I would presume the rebrand is related to the fact that the IWD is handling more generic workloads than simply those related to WebSphere and therefore deserved a more general name.

You can read the full marketing rundown on the IBM website here:  IBM Workload Deployer

This is a “cloud management in a box” solution that you drop onto your network, point at one one or more of the supported hypervisors, and it handles images, load allocation, provisioning etc.  You can give it simple images to manage, but the thing really lights up when you give it “Patterns” – a term which translates to a full application infrastructure (balancing webservers, middleware, DB, etc.).  If you use this setup, the IWD will let you manage your application as a single entity and maintain the connections for you.

I am not an expert on the thing – at least not yet, but a couple of other points that immediately jump out at me are:

  • The thing also has a pretty rich Python-based command line client that should allow us to do some smart script stuff and maintain those in a proper source repository.
  • The patterns and resources also have intelligence in them where you can’t break dependencies of a published configuration
  • There are a number of pre-cooked template images that don’t seem very locked down that you can use as starter points for customization or you can roll your own.
  • The Rational Automation Framework tool is here, too, so that brings up some migration possibilities for folks looking to bring apps either into a ‘cloud’ or a better managed virtual situation
I do get to be one of the first folks to play with the thing, so I’ll be drilling into as many of these these and other things as time permits.  More on it as it becomes available.